Deaths

Headlines

  • Across the district there are around 3,300 deaths each year, roughly equating to 1% of the population of 337,000 residents of Wakefield district.
  • Infant mortality is low in the district, with rates being similar to the national average. Wakefield has less than 3.2 deaths per 1,000 live births compared to the national average of around 4 per 1,000 live births (2014-2016).
  • In 2016, there were a recorded total of 3,299 deaths in the Wakefield District; 1,152 (34.9%) of those were categorised as premature (under 75 years old at time of death).
    • Of the total deaths in Wakefield during 2016; 1,690 (51%) were female and 1,609 (49%) were male, resulting in almost a 50/50 split.
  • Between 2014-2016, the number of deaths in Wakefield was greater in the most deprived areas, compared with the least deprived areas of the district. For example: a combined total deaths of 2,263 was reported in deciles 1 and 2 (most deprived), compared with a collective 1,607 reported in deciles 9 and 10 (least deprived) out of an aggregated 3 year total of 9,822 deaths.

The Population

  • Cohort: the population for Wakefield District is recorded as having 337,094 residents (as per Healthier Lives PHE website).
  • Summary
  • Links to other pages:
      • More information on infant mortality can be found on our infant mortality page.
      • More information on life expectancy can be found on our life expectancy page.
      • More information on the segment tool, can be found on the Fingertips page.
Premature Deaths

As an outcome of poor health and wellbeing, premature deaths rates show the diseases that are driving the short lives in an area.

Premature deaths are defined as people under 75 years of age at time of death, regardless of the cause.

Between 2014-2016, there were 3,484 premature deaths (35.5%) of 9,822 in Wakefield, compared to previous years with a total of 3,385 out of 9,671 deaths during 2013-2015, equating to 35.0%.

A number of mortality rates are aggregated into 3 years due to sample sizes, plus by having 3-yearly data; allows us to look at trends. The following information is shown by aggregated data for 2014-2016, unless stated otherwise.

Overall

  • Nationally, Wakefield district was ranked the 113th worst of 150 Local Authorities (LAs) across the country for overall premature deaths, with a total of 396 per 100,000. The lowest was Rutland with 238 per 100,000, and the highest was Blackpool resulting in 546 per 100,000.
    • Wakefield district was also ranked 11th of 15 similar LAs for overall premature deaths. The LAs compared to Wakefield were in the same Socioeconomic deprivation bracket; categorised within decile 4, which is classed as “more deprived” – deprivation covers a broad range of issues and refers to unmet needs caused by a lack of resources of all kinds, not just financial.

Cancer
    • Wakefield district resulted in being the 120th worst LA of 150 for lung cancer deaths, with around 74 of 100,000 (all ages).
    • Wakefield district was ranked 110th out of 150 LA’s for premature deaths (under 75s) due to breast cancer, resulting in 22 per 100,000, which is rated worse than average.
    • Interestingly, Wakefield was rated better than average for premature deaths, ranking 62nd out of 150 LAs for colorectal cancer deaths with roughly 12 per 100,000.
    • Premature cancer deaths within the Wakefield district ranks 105th of 150 LA’s, averaging circa 150 per 100,000; common causes include: smoking, alcohol and poor diet.
    • More information on life expectancy can be found on our cancer page.
Heart Disease and Stroke
  • Wakefield district ranked 124th of 150 LAs for premature deaths with an underlying cause of heart disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease). Approximately 94 per 100,000 of these deaths were primarily due to high blood pressure, smoking, and/or poor diet.
    • Around 55 per 100,000 premature deaths in Wakefield district resulted in heart disease, ranking Wakefield the 134th worst out of 150 LAs in England.
    • Stroke deaths in the Wakefield district ranked the 130th worst LA out of 149, resulting in the region of 19 deaths per 100,000 under 75 years of age.
    • More information on cardiovascular disease can be found on our cardiovascular disease page.
Source: https://healthierlives.phe.org.uk/topic/mortality

The Burden

  • Comparing Wakefield to other LA’s and England.
    • Key facts from Fingertips
    • Table and hyperlinks.

The below demonstrates the current position in Wakefield in relation to our Yorkshire and Humber neighbours across several of the key mortality indicators. Wakefield is currently significantly worse than the England average for many disease measures (those indicators coloured red). Areas of specific concern include the rising trend in …

You can click on the “trends” option below to explore the trends in the various measures.

Source: Public Health England
All of the major disease groups are covered by premature mortality statistics. The rates are standardised for the population within an area for age and sex. This creates the comparative rates that allow Wakefield to be compared with the national average. The area fairs poorly against this benchmark for most of the disease mortality indicators, demonstrating that people in the area are more likely to die aged under 75 years from most of the major diseases including; cardiovascular, cancer, respiratory and liver diseases.

Inequality

    • Analysis  – differences between genders, areas of deprivation etc.
    • The bar chart below shows the differences in mortality rates for disease type. This can be used to explore geographical differences by looking at the rates in different wards, and to look at the differences between males and females.The bar chart dashboard can also be used to demonstrate that deaths show a high correlation with areas of deprivation. This can be seen by selecting “Deciles” on the options to the right of the dashboard.
    • The table below demonstrates the standardised rates for premature mortality in Wakefield, from the major disease groups. The rates are calculated separately for males and females, demonstrating the differences between the genders for disease burden.
    • Dying younger in the district is associated with deprivation; those areas that are more deprived have greater rates of mortality when standardised. This is consistent across diseases such as cardiovascular, heart, cancer and liver disease. In addition males fair worse in terms of mortality rates, dying younger than females in a similarly deprived area.

      The bar chart below shows the differences in mortality rates for disease type. This can be used to explore geographical differences by looking at the rates in different wards, and to look at the differences between males and females.

      The bar chart dashboard can also be used to demonstrate that mortality rates show a high correlation with areas of deprivation. This can be seen by selecting “Deciles” on the options to the right of the dashboard.

Dying younger in the district is associated with deprivation; those areas that are more deprived have greater rates of mortality when standardised. This is consistent across diseases such as cardiovascular, heart, cancer and liver disease. In addition males fair worse in terms of mortality rates, dying younger than females in a similarly deprived area.

Resources

Infant Mortality Profiles

End of Life Profiles

We have produced a factsheet on mortality headlines in Wakefield, using data from Fingertips. You can download it here

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